CAN YOU HELP GIVE WATCHET THE RECOGNITION IT DESERVES

A new survey asking the Watchet residents to ‘Help get Watchet’s amazing community spirit recognised’ is being run by Watchet’s Coastal Community Team. They will be bidding to take part in the second round of the government’s Place-Based Social Action programme, and, if successful, will be able to apply for funding to deliver community projects. To understand what problems people would like to address, and ideas they might have in solving these difficulties, the survey will be distributed to every household in Watchet over August asking the following questions:

  1. What do you think the main difficulties here are?
  2. What ideas do you have for local people getting together to help make life better or easier here?
  3. Tell us the ways in which people and the community already help each other?

The survey can also be accessed online by following this link: www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/CCTSocialAction

As a thank you for contributing, the CCT are offering a prize draw of £100 to a community group or organisation, nominated by those who complete the survey.

Watchet Coastal Community Team is one of only 20 partnerships countrywide to be selected for the Place-Based Social Action programme. The project aims to show how strong community action can help solve the kinds of difficulties in the town that prevent it from flourishing as it should. These difficulties might range from isolation in older people, to a lack of opportunities for young people, or even more day-to-day issues such as dog mess and littering. Ideas for how people can get together to help solve these difficulties as a strong community can then be put forward in a bid in October 2018, and, if successful, could win funding to help deliver those ideas. The initiative is funded by Big Lottery Fund and the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS).

Watchet CCT chairman, Cllr Peter Murphy says: “Our community spirit here in Watchet is something to be really proud of, and we intend to celebrate it at a national level. In this project we also plan to make the most of that energy by directing it towards helping to solve some of the more serious problems here. We believe that the combination of community action and local services working in collaboration has potential to achieve great things and we are excited to see how this project develops. Please do take part in the survey and help make this project a success.”

Watchet Coastal Community Team is a partnership organisation made up of 30 local organisations, businesses, community groups and Town, District and County Council. The team work collaboratively to help further initiatives that help to benefit the town both economically and socially. To find out more visit: www.watchetcct.co.uk.

Or for more information contact Georgie Grant: Secretary, Watchet Coastal Community Team Georgie@onioncollective.co.uk/ 07940 950396.

MAN FINED FOR TOMBSTONING FROM ILFRACOMBE HARBOUR

This is a press release issue by North Devon Council

North Devon Council has successfully prosecuted a man for ‘tombstoning’ from Ilfracombe Harbour.

 On 31 July magistrates at Barnstaple heard that Luke Harris, aged 24 of Oliver Road, Barnstaple, had been seen naked and in full view of families and children on South Quay on Sunday 8 July. He ignored requests by the Deputy Harbourmaster to get dressed, and instead jumped into the water five metres below. Two other young men were also swimming in the harbour, and all were shouting and swearing.

As a result of his actions, which were in contravention of the swimming byelaw that exists at the harbour, Mr Harris was fined £250 and ordered to pay the victim’s surcharge of £30 and £60 costs.

Ilfracombe Harbourmaster, Georgina Carlo-Paat, says: “Not only is tombstoning in the harbour extremely dangerous, it is also against the law. Jumping from the harbour walls may seem like good fun, but people who do this are risking their own lives. The harbour structures themselves can be dangerous, with chains and protrusions that can cause injury before someone has even hit the water. The water depth alters with the tide and water may be shallower than it seems, with submerged objects like rocks beneath the water. Boats and ships come in and out of the harbour all the time, and currents can be strong, even when the water appears calm.

“The risk is even higher when the participants have been drinking heavily. I hope that this prosecution sends out a clear message to the public that tombstoning will not be tolerated at the harbour; together with the police and CCTV evidence, we will continue to monitor this behaviour and tackle it before somebody gets seriously hurt, or worse.”

The penalty for jumping off the harbour can be up to a £1,000 fine upon prosecution.