Category Archives: Exmoor Society News

EXTRA SUPPORT FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS AND FOR THE EXMOOR HILL FARMING NETWORK

The Exmoor Society has announced that it is to give more help to young people through the Pinnacle Award, and also to the Exmoor Hill Farming Network, through an overall cash injection of £10,000. First, the annual 2020 Pinnacle Award has been increased to £5,000 and extended to young people between 18 and 35 years old.  This year, because of coronavirus, the closing date is now to be later moving from the end of June to midnight on Monday 2 November.

Set up in 2011, the Award is open to an individual or group. They must live, work or study in the Greater Exmoor area and have an idea for a land-based business venture. Previous applications have come from ideas as diverse as cider-making, developing a herd of pedigree cattle, country clothing, setting up an agricultural and forestry contracting businesses, bee-keeping with honey production and outdoor tourist activities.

The application process is designed to be accessible to all with a basic form to complete and an informal interview to be held in November.  Rachel Thomas, Chairman of The Exmoor Society, said, “As a landscape conservation charity we fully recognise the importance of providing opportunities for people to live in the area, undertaking jobs, showing beautiful landscapes and livelihoods can go together in National Parks.”

Second, since the early years of the twenty-first century, The Exmoor Society has played an important role in showing the inter-relationship between farming and national park purposes which several examples show.  In 2004, it commissioned “Moorlands at a Crossroads” report which identified the key role of moorland farmers in maintaining traditional practices and in the socio-economic life of the moor.  A reception in the House of Lords in 2008 raised the plight of hill farmers to ministers and MPs; in 2016 it enabled the Duchy College Rural Business School to analyse the economic state of Exmoor farms providing evidence of high dependence on agri-environmental schemes.  More recently its “Towards a Register of Exmoor’s Natural Capital” report has indicated the wide range of public services that farmers provide for public payments and is now being tested and trialled for a new agri-environmental scheme.

“We have seen the significant role the Exmoor Hill Farming Network now plays in working closely with the Exmoor National Park Authority and we wish to support them both further with sustainable farming practices, conservation and protection of the environment all part of our charitable objectives,” Rachel Thomas concluded. The Exmoor Society is giving the Network £5,000 this year to help with financial struggles over the impact of coronavirus and continued support in the future.  On receiving the news Katherine Williams, Network Officer said “The Chairman and Board members thank The Exmoor Society very much for this overwhelming donation towards Network activities.”

CELEBRATING EXMOOR THROUGH THE POWER OF POETRY

The Exmoor Society has just announced the winners of its poetry competition for 2020.  The purpose of the competition is to inspire people about Exmoor, one of England’s finest landscapes, and especially poignant this year with the travel restrictions.

The judges were impressed with the standard of entries.  Rachel Thomas, The Exmoor Society Chairman, said: “I am delighted the Society is encouraging the literary traditions.  Each poem was judged anonymously and I am very grateful to the two judges, prize-winning poets themselves, who had the very difficult task of choosing the winners.”

First prize went to Terry Dyson and the judges’ commented: “Exmoor is a place of many kinds of mood. Its dramatic forms, wild weather and long distances encourage reflection. Here, the poet first conjures up the dynamic life of a specific Exmoor place at dawn and then finds that ‘Time scatters’ as past history comes tumbling – like the swallows – into the present. The past, the Second World War, is in turn vividly conjured by ‘A man preparing to leave’ – on active duty, no doubt. The endings of poems are always of particular interest. Here the poet first shows us the ‘perfect V’ of Victory and then leaves us with a great contrasting detail: the returning soldier’s ‘grinning irregular teeth’. The poem is especially timely as we remember VE Day on its 75th anniversary. Apart from its notable woodlands, North Hill is strongly associated with WWII through the important battle training carried out here.”

1st Prize: ‘North Hill’ by Terry Dyson

At first blink of light
vague haze of pink
I dream of you all as stripling oaks
branches squabbling fisticuffs
scratching low at my windowpane.

Only real sound so far      my heart
drifting home to its shell
demanding more
of your wartime spiel
spat and disorder before I was born.

Time scatters as swallows
tumble      and hefted ewes blare
to a drumming
exchange of war
rippling gun fire      fracturing air.

Did I hear your voice  –  just then?

A man preparing to leave
thumping feet
tea slurped      slosh of sugar
clank of alloy spoon
brush of bags dragged along the floor.

Sunlight splinters through, and just
when I think you’ve gone
you’re back      turning

to raise a perfect “V”
grinning irregular teeth.

Second prize was awarded to Jan Martin’s poem, of which the judges said: “Like ‘North Hill’, this poem opens out from a particular Exmoor place onto a landscape of reflection and history. However, here the time is deeper, stretching back to the ‘hidden chapel’ of a remote past, and also looking forward – or perhaps we should say ‘listening forward’ into a ‘far future’. The poem’s short lines help focus on the strong beats on important words, such as ‘the rocks and crags / of our faces’, a bold shift from the outer landscape of rugged Exmoor to the close-up anatomy of an ageing individual. The poem produces a lulling rhythm suitable to the convincing image at its close, in which ‘the wind / from a far future blows quiet songs’. The active verb ‘blows’ is especially well-chosen here.

2nd Prize: ‘Porlock Weir’ by Jan Martin

Where the land falls
into brown sea,
and stones rattle under the surf
like rounds of applause,
there’s a history
that’s invisible and alive
in scorching wind,
or gray stillness tracked
by unbearably sweet birdsong
and the crack of guns.

There’s a haunted wood and
a hidden chapel that draws us up,
and dense silence settling like fog
softens our outlines
and soothes our horizons
into dreams of another life,
where our stories can embrace
all the rocks and crags
of our faces, and the wind
from a far future blows quiet songs.

Of the third-prize-winning poem by Richard Westcott, the judges commented: “Exmoor is a place of literary pilgrimage, as we have been reminded often in the year in which the 250th anniversary of Wordsworth’s birth is being celebrated. As well as Coleridge and Shelley, other – later – artistic talents are deeply associated with Exmoor and one of them particularly, Hope Bourne, with the site of this poem. The poet celebrates not only a remarkable artistic personality, but also the wildness of Exmoor – and finds a way to blend the two.”

3rd Prize: ‘In a Storm on Ferny Ball’ by Richard Westcott

Bright beech branches bend in the wind –
fragments flying.  I turn from the west,
rain on my back, clothes stuck close.

Was that the protesting movement of trees
or something different – a reminder
of someone shuffling then sliding
through the loosened-up, torn-apart hedge?

Crooked and trunk-twisted, bent like a tree
the vision continues to vanish –
washed away in the rain, as if wishing
to be somewhere else.  No shelter or company
anywhere here, just sharp surgings,
straight-ahead rain – the prevails of a gale,
such as she would know only too well.

Struck on the neck by a stick in the wind
I spin round, feeling a summons
to face all these forces. Part deafened,
face streaming, I find my thoughts
scattered like leaves. Nothing is
tamed. Here this is wildness where
the loosened is freed and freed are caught.

Who would be out in a place like this
on a day such as this, unless fleeing
from home and from others, with a wish
to be elsewhere? She’s slipping past green trunks
of bent-over beech, whose branches are waving
at a dwindling figure now blown away
by this westerly, and storm-distorted senses.

The three winning poems are on The Exmoor Society’s website and will be published in the 2021 edition of the Exmoor Review, the Society’s annual journal.  There are also plans to collate a selection of the competition entries from the last few years into an anthology of Exmoor poems.

Top: The track from Ferny Ball – Hope Bourne © The Exmoor Society

EXMOOR SOCIETY PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION WINNERS

The winners of the prestigious Alfred Vowles Photographic Competition were announced recently by The Exmoor Society.  There were four categories: Landscape, Exmoor Activities, Heritage Buildings and Wildlife, with a prize of £50 awarded to the winner of each category and the overall winner also receiving the Alfred Vowles trophy.

“The judges were impressed by the quality and wide range of subject matter in the four categories,” said Jill Edwards, Trustee of The Exmoor Society. “They admitted that choosing winners was a difficult task, particularly in the Landscape category, which has a large number of entries.  The care and attention which the photographers had given to their work is to be applauded.”

Leanna Coles, whose ‘Seat with a View’ looking towards Cloutsham and beyond was both the overall winner and winner of the Landscape category (pictured, top),  was praised for capturing a particularly vibrant Exmoor landscape with excellent lighting and detail, and a wonderful sky.  She also won the Wildlife category with her ‘Tippbarlake Exmoor pony herd gathering on Brendon Common’: a spectacular image of this iconic Exmoor event.

Also to be congratulated is Madeline Taylor who won both the Exmoor Activities and the Heritage Buildings categories with her photographs of the Allerford Forge and of the gated entrance to the Worthy Combe toll road; two images that capture the spirit and history of the National Park. Her ‘Having a “splashing” good time in Horner Water’ in the former category was Highly Commended.

In the Landscape category, Madeline Taylor’s ‘A Walk along the River at Watersmeet’ was Highly Commended and Sharon Bailey’s ‘Looking towards Twitchen’ and ‘Valley of Rocks’ was Commended. All these show the beauty and variety of Exmoor’s landscape.  In the Wildlife category Tricia Gibson’s ‘Exmoor pony, Persica, and her six-day old foal’ and ‘Tawbits Lorna Doone with her new born filly foal’ were Highly Commended for their good composition and sensitivity.  Highly Commended also, in the Heritage Buildings category, was Patrick Hoyte’s evocative black-and-white photograph of ‘The Stables at Dunster Castle’.

Alfred Vowles was a well-known photographer at the beginning of the twentieth century.  Rachel Thomas, Chairman of the Society, said, “The Vowles’ family kindly donated the trophy to The Exmoor Society in Alfred’s memory, in order to help inspire future generations to capture the essence of Exmoor and its special qualities through photography.”

The winning photographs will be on display at the Society’s headquarters at 34 High Street, Dulverton, and on its website www.exmoorsociety.com

THE EXMOOR SOCIETY LUCY PERRY LITERARY AWARD

The Exmoor Society is pleased to announce the junior and senior winners of its annual Lucy Perry Literary Competition for Schools.  The prizes were presented at the South Molton Community Primary School in South Molton and at the West Buckland School, West Buckland.

At South Molton, head teacher Mr Parkin introduced the assembled children and the first prizewinner from the competition’s Junior Category, Jack Hosegood, with his parents present.  Jack read his winning poem ‘What I enjoy about Exmoor’ and was then given Palgrave’s ‘Golden Treasury of Verse’ and his certificate.  Former Exmoor Society trustee and competition judge, Elizabeth McLaughlin, presented the cheque for the school to Mr Parkin, who said: “It is to be spent on acquiring new books for the library as well as improving the library space.  There is much poetry in the curriculum and everyone is thrilled to have a winning poet at the school.”

The presentations in West Buckland School’s Michael Morpurgo Library were to two successful poets from the Senior category. The winner of the first prize was Isaac Spear with his poem entitled ‘Devon’ and the third prizewinner was Jazz Clarke with her poem ‘The Waymarker’.  Isaac received his prize of an autographed and inscribed book of poetry by children’s author Michael Morpurgo, and both young poets were presented with certificates. The Exmoor Society’s cheque was given to the school librarian.

The Exmoor Society emphasises the importance of having young people writing poetry and prose at a sponsored competition level, and acknowledges the importance of visiting the winning schools to make the presentations. One of the judges, Cathy Nicholls, said: “I commend the positive and receptive teachers and pupils on Exmoor and are confident that the competition will increasingly attract entries from many other schools.”

You can read the winning poems and find information on the Lucy Perry Competition 2020 on The Exmoor Society’s website www.exmoorsociety.com/content/what-we-do/competitions-awards.

PHOTO: Jack Hosegood of South Molton School – winner of the Junior Category. He is pictured with Cathy Nicholls (left) and Elizabeth McLaughlin (right).

JUST THIS WEEK LEFT TO APPLY FOR PINNACLE AWARD

The 2019 Pinnacle Award, organised by The Exmoor Society, is open to young people aged between 18 and 27 years who live, work or study in the Greater Exmoor area.  It offers up to £3,000 to an individual or group with an idea for a business venture based on Exmoor, for example in agriculture, forestry, food and drink, conservation, horticulture, craft or tourism.  The Award, now in its eighth year, was set up by The Exmoor Society to help young entrepreneurs live and work on Exmoor. As a conservation body, the Society fully recognises the importance of providing opportunities for young people to continue to live in the area by encouraging entrepreneurial activity.  The award also helps to promote the idea that livelihoods and beautiful landscapes in a National Park do go together.

Previous applications have come from people with ideas as diverse as making cider and developing a herd of pedigree cattle.  The award so far has helped fund young people either to set up or take forward businesses such as agricultural contracting, country clothing, arboriculture, metalworking and woodland management.  There were three successful applicants in 2018: Polly Goodman, Philip Stephens and Camilla Waterer, who were developing respectively goat meat from local herds, vehicle canopies from lightweight material and horse-drawn carriage rides over the moor for celebrations and special picnics.  All three applicants impressed the judges so much that Trustees decided to offer the full award to each one in celebration of the Society’s 60th anniversary.

The application process is designed to be accessible to all with a basic form to complete and a reference provided by a mentor or sponsor.  Applicants will be invited to an informal interview where judges will be looking for business ventures related to Exmoor’s rural character and likely to provide a sustainable living, with perhaps the potential in the future to offer further employment.

Chairman of the Society, Rachel Thomas, said: “There is a great deal of concern that young people have to leave Exmoor because of the lack of employment.  By providing seed core money through the Pinnacle Award, the Society hopes to enable them to stay in the area and keep the moor alive and thriving.”

The Society hopes to attract even more entries for the award this year which is open for applications with the closing date being 30 June 2019.  Forms are available on the Society’s website at www.exmoorsociety.com or by contacting its Dulverton office on 01398 323335, info@exmoorsociety.com.

Image: Tom Lile, blacksmith and metalworker.

EXMOOR GUIDED WALKS RETURN FOR SPRING

A series of free guided walks is now under way across Exmoor, led by an expert team of local volunteers from the Exmoor National Park Authority and The Exmoor Society. Nearly 100 walks will take place between now and October, with the addition of some new routes as well as old favourites.

The history of Exmoor’s settlements is covered in walking tours of Lynton and Lynmouth, Bossington, Porlock and Dunster, there’s insight into the Knight family’s estate in Exmoor’s former Royal hunting Forest at Simonsbath, a chance to tread in the footsteps of Saxon soldiers along the ancient Somerset Harepath (or Herepath), tales of murder at the abandoned mine of Wheal Eliza, a walk around Lorna Doone country, and a glimpse of the evolving salt marsh habitat at Porlock Marsh.

Natural history is also included, with walks discovering Exmoor’s butterflies and bats, coastal wildlife, temperate rainforests and how the heather moorlands are managed, as well as rambles looking at water quality improvement schemes and landscape restoration.

In May there will be four new walks linked to the annual Simonsbath Festival on the subjects of Exmoor during the Second World War, the rivers of the moor, the 150th Anniversary of R.D. Blackmore’s Lorna Doone, and the Exmoor home of Byron’s daughter Ada Lovelace, a pioneer of computer programming.

Liz Pile, Walks Coordinator for The Exmoor Society, said: “The wonderfully diverse walks programme is only possible through the generosity of walk leaders in sharing their time, expertise and passion for Exmoor. The Society pays tribute to all those who lead walks in all weathers and in all places.”

Jess Twydall, Exmoor National Park Authority’s Get Involved Project Coordinator, commented: “Whether you’re fascinated by local history and village life, or looking for a longer moorland walk taking in the breath-taking scenery, there’s truly something for everyone.”

Walks generally last 1-4 hours and there is no charge, but donations are welcomed to ‘The Exmoor Society’ or ‘CareMoor for Exmoor’ towards keeping the National Park special.

The full programme of walks can be found on the ENPA and The Exmoor Society websites and in Exmoor Visitor magazine, which is available free at all National Park Centres and at The Exmoor Society’s Resource Centre in Dulverton, where advice can also be obtained.

PHOTO: Herepath, by Stan Lester.

INSPIRATIONAL EXMOOR: EXMOOR SOCIETY SPRING CONFERENCE

The Exmoor Society’s 15th annual Spring Conference, in partnership with Exmoor National Park Authority, has the theme of how natural beauty positively affects people’s wellbeing and will be held on 12 April 2019 at Dunster Tithe Barn.

2019 is the 70th anniversary of the 1949 National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act and celebrates how they are special places where nature and people over time have produced areas of distinct character with significant ecological, biological, cultural and scenic values. The Government’s 25-year Environment Plan states that the creation of designated landscapes has been among the most outstanding environmental achievements of the past 100 years. At the same time, it has set up the Glover Review to see what changes are needed in delivering the National Park purposes and enhancing their environments and communities.

The conference will celebrate the British approach to the National Park concept by exploring what is inspirational about them and Exmoor in particular and how they contribute to the nation’s wellbeing from local to the national and international levels. National Parks have inspired people in the past and continue to do so today, and even though they face many challenges, there is hope for a richer future.

Dame Fiona Reynolds will open the conference by speaking about her recent book Fight for Beauty. As a member of the Glover Panel, her message and thoughts will be particularly pertinent. Peter Beacham OBE was responsible for the former English Heritage’s listing programme and will describe the significance of buildings in the landscape. He will be followed by Rob Wilson-North, Exmoor National Park Authority, Head of Conservation & Access, who will explore Exmoor’s unexpected delights.

Adrian Colston, researcher at Exeter University into the management of the natural environment, will discuss hill-farming in a time of change. Interlaced throughout the proceedings will be poems celebrating Exmoor’s farming life read by poet, Adam Horovitz, whose book The Soil Never Sleeps has been widely acclaimed.

The Society Chairman, Rachel Thomas, said: “National Parks were created because of their spectacular scenery, wide open spaces, rich wildlife and biodiversity, a rural culture stretching back to prehistoric times and their suitability for outdoor recreation. There is certainly much to celebrate about them and be inspired by places like Exmoor.”  The conference will close with further information on how Exmoor will be celebrating the 1949 Act.

The Spring Conference will be held on 12 April 2019 at Dunster Tithe Barn from 10am to 3pm and will include lunch. Further details and booking can be found on www.exmoorsociety.com or by telephoning The Exmoor Society on 01398 323335.

PHOTO by Jane A. Mares, from Exmoor Magazine

APPLICATIONS ARE INVITED NOW FOR THE 2019 PINNACLE AWARD

The 2019 Pinnacle Award, organised by The Exmoor Society, is now open to young people aged between 18 and 27 years who live, work or study in the Greater Exmoor area.  It offers up to £3,000 to an individual or group who have an idea for a business venture based on Exmoor, for example in agriculture, forestry, food and drink, conservation, horticulture, craft, tourism, or any outdoor land-based activity. 

The Award, now in its eighth year, was set up by The Exmoor Society to help young entrepreneurs live and work on Exmoor. As a conservation body, the Society fully recognises the importance of providing opportunities for young people to continue to live in the area by encouraging entrepreneurial activity.  The award also helps to promote the idea that beautiful landscapes and livelihoods in a National Park do go together.

Previous applications have come from people with ideas as diverse as making cider and developing a herd of pedigree cattle.  The award so far has helped fund young people either to set up or take forward businesses such as agricultural contracting, country clothing and woodland management.  There were three successful applicants in 2018: Polly Goodman, Philip Stephens and Camilla Waterer, who were developing goat meat from local herds, vehicle canopies from lightweight material and horse-drawn carriage rides over the moor for celebrations and special picnics.  All three applicants impressed the judges so much that Trustees decided to offer the full award to each one.

The application process is designed to be accessible to all, with a basic form to complete and a reference provided by a mentor or sponsor.  Applicants will be invited to an informal interview where judges will be looking for business ventures related to Exmoor’s rural character and likely to provide a sustainable living, with perhaps the potential in the future to offer further employment. Chairman of the Society, Rachel Thomas, said: “There is a great deal of concern that young people have to leave Exmoor because of the lack of employment.  By providing seed core money through the Pinnacle Award, the Society hopes to enable them to stay in the area and keep the moor alive and thriving.”

The Society hopes to attract even more entries for the award this year which is now open for applications with the closing date being 30 June 2019.  Forms are available on the Society’s website at www.exmoorsociety.com or by contacting its Dulverton office on 01398 323335, info@exmoorsociety.com.

FUNDING BOOST FOR PROJECTS CELEBRATING EXMOOR

Five new community projects set to benefit Exmoor and its special qualities are the latest to receive grants from the Exmoor National Park Partnership Fund*.

All the schemes have been awarded funding of up to £2,500 in recognition of their contribution to National Park purposes to conserve and enhance the wildlife, natural beauty and cultural heritage of the area, and promote opportunities for people to enjoy them.

Successful bids included money towards a unique poetry project, jointly funded with the Exmoor Society, looking to raise awareness of the benefits of pasture-fed livestock. Poet Adam Horovitz will be staying with two Exmoor Hill Farming Network farmers who are championing the approach, and turning his experiences into a collection of poetry encapsulating how they work in harmony with nature to raise their animals. They will be published later this year as an addition to ‘The Soil Never Sleeps’ – an earlier collection inspired by shadowing farmers throughout the seasons.

The project is the brainwave of John Meadley, President of the Pasture-Fed Livestock Association – an alliance of certified farms committed to feeding their livestock on 100% pasture throughout life. He said: “There aren’t many farming organisations who can say they have a poet in residence, but thanks to this grant we’re delighted to be working with Adam to help promote the many benefits of raising livestock in the way nature intended. We hope that through his unique talent for capturing the passions and beliefs that drive farmers, we’ll be able to convince more people why pasture-fed is best for their health, the planet, the welfare of the animals and even the farmer’s purse.”

Philip Kiberd, Funding Officer at Exmoor National Park Authority, said: “The Partnership Fund exists for the benefit of everyone who lives in, visits and cares about the National Park. We can offer match funding of up to £2,500 in return for either cash or in-kind contributions, such as volunteer time, making it really accessible for anyone with a great idea to get help with funding. It’s great to see so many innovative projects going on in the National Park and we look forward to awarding the next round of funding in March.”

Funding awards are made around four times a year, and applicants have until 4 March to submit an expression of interest in time to be considered for the next funding round. Community-led projects that can enhance the landscape, help nature, investigate heritage or introduce new people to the National Park are of particular interest. 2019 is also the Year of Green Action and the 70th anniversary of the founding legislation for UK National Parks, providing further inspiration for people to put forward their ideas.

Full details, guidance notes and application forms are available on the Authority’s website at www.exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk/partnership-fund or to discuss an idea contact the Funding Officer on 01398 322237 or partnershipfund@exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk.

* Recently supported projects include:
1.     A grant to help protect and conserve Brendon Hill Methodist Church, safeguarding part of Exmoor’s building heritage
2.     Funding towards the development of Porlock Weir Pilot Gig  Club adding to recreational activity on Exmoor’s coast
3.     A contribution to a new floodgate at Western Beach, Lynmouth, allowing winter access for people, while keeping the storms out
4.     A grant for a farming poetry project offering an alternative voice to Exmoor hill farming
5.     Funding towards a Lorna Doone exhibition led by Dulverton Heritage Centre, celebrating 150 years, in 2019, since the publication of this Exmoor novel.


PHOTO: Exmoor hill farmer Oliver Edwards pictured with poet Adam Horovitz during a recent stay at Westermill Farm to learn about lambing.

THE EXMOOR SOCIETY CELEBRATES ITS FOUNDATION

The Exmoor Society, celebrating its 60th anniversary, recently returned to its roots at Simonsbath House Hotel, as it was here that the Society was formally founded, on 28 November 1958.

Simonsbath Lodge, as it was then called, was the home of John Coleman Cooke, the first Chairman of the Society. Trustees and members were entertained by a dramatic dialogue, written by Trustee Roger Watts, that brought alive the reasons for the formation of the charity. The President, Sir Antony Acland, proposed a toast to the Society, followed by a convivial and delicious buffet lunch.

In 1958, proposals to afforest The Chains, the central moorland area, were made public. The National Park had only just been designated, mainly because of its wild and remote moorland. Local people from the Barnstaple area and the Dunkery side of Exmoor and coastal communities were horrified at this idea. They decided to start a petition, backed by the North Devon Journal, which collected over 3,000 signatures and was successful in persuading the Forestry Commission to withdraw their plans. Dated 28 November 1958, The Sunday Times ran an article headlined ‘No Conifers for Exmoor’ and reported that an Exmoor Preservation Society was formed on 28 November 1958. A Society that could present alternative views to public bodies and encourage activities beneficial to Exmoor was the core purpose of the founding fathers.

Steven Pugsley, local District Councillor and member of the ENPA, outlined what he considered to be The Exmoor Society’s achievements today. He mentioned the series of studies which the Society has commissioned in relation to moorland, landscape, upland farming and natural capital all providing evidence to influence National Park policy. He emphasised the development of the new and prestigious Exmoor Resource Centre and the Exmoor Review, now in its 60th edition. He also referred to the Society’s Pinnacle Award for young entrepreneurs, encouraging new generations of young people to live and work on Exmoor, keeping it vibrant and alive. He described The Exmoor Society in 2018 as supportive, active, professional, visible and enjoyable, adding: “Today it is widely respected and in vigorous health.”

Find out more about the Exmoor Society on their website.