Category Archives: Heritage

PIONEERING FEMALE MATHEMATICIAN’S FORGOTTEN LEGACY AND PORLOCK’S INSPIRATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY ON 5 OCTOBER

It will soon be possible to walk in the footsteps of  nineteenth-century computer pioneer Ada Lovelace when visiting Exmoor National Park, as work has begun this month to restore and reveal parts of the historic carriage routes, viewpoints and other features that formed part of her former Porlock estate.

It is while walking the terraces of these once ornate gardens that Ada and the famous mathematician Charles Babbage were reputed to have come up with the principles behind the ‘Difference Engine’ – a forerunner to the computer.

The National Park Authority now plans to restore parts of the old carriage ways and other surviving features in Culbone wood, granting walkers on the South West Coast Path a taste of the sense of awe that must have been felt upon emerging from historic tunnels into breathtaking views out to sea, framed by groves of giant redwoods and firs.

The effect was created by Ada Lovelace and her husband, William King, as part of a Picturesque designed landscape inspired by the fashion at the time to try and capture the beauty of nature by design. Exmoor National Park Authority are also undertaking a detailed survey to identify if any of the original trees planted by Ada and William survive.

Graeme McVittie, Exmoor National Park’s Senior Woodland Officer, said: “Woodland walks carefully planted with native and exotic species to maximise dramatic effect, long, mysterious tunnels set to build anticipation ahead of awe-inspiring views and the remnants of meandering old carriage ways designed to show off the best of the coastal views are all part of this estate’s forgotten legacy.

“The principles of the early-nineteenth-century Picturesque movement were to create views or pictures into the natural world. And now we are simply trying to create a picture into their world, and the passions and inspirations that lay behind Ada’s genius.”

On 5 October Porlock will also be holding their annual “Cream Tea with Inspirational Women” in celebration of Ada Lovelace Day, held annually in honour of the achievements of women in science all over the world. The ticketed event held at Porlock Village Hall sees five women, from the worlds of art, travel, film, education and theatre, share their passions, achievements and inspirations, with this year’s speakers billed as Molly Rooke, Hilary Bradt, Lynn Pearson, Jane Keeley and Sarah Peterkin. Information and tickets are available from Porlock Village Hall (01643 863117).

Rosalinde Haw, who is organising the event, said: “We celebrate Ada for her connection to the landscape and the inspiration she brought to all women, at a time when the very idea of a female mathematician was often viewed as distasteful. Join us this October to hear from today’s inspirational women and how their passions have helped drive them to success.”

BAMPTON EVENT CELEBRATES HISTORIC BUILDINGS

The Bampton Heritage and Visitor Centre are delighted to be holding a special event on Friday 20 September to unveil their new ‘Our Buildings’ exhibition boards, oral histories and family trail.

The exhibition, which will be on display in the centre for a limited period from the end of September, is the result of a year-long project researching and collating information about the history of some of the town’s buildings. The project was supported by a grant from The National Lottery Heritage Fund. Volunteers visited various homes and then conducted research both online and at the Devon Heritage Centre in Exeter. They looked into a buildings’ ages, construction and architectural details as well as their different uses over time and the people who lived there.

Another strand of the project was to trace residents who had recollections of the town and its buildings from the middle of last century – they were then recorded and the material carefully edited to form a digital oral archive of the town for future generations.

Bridge House Luke Street

Judi Thomas, a trustee of the Heritage Centre, who was in charge of the oral history recordings, said, “All too often we leave it too late to record the memories of older family members and residents but their accounts form such a valuable addition to the heritage of our town. Young people in particular can learn such a huge amount about everyday life from the past by listening to recordings.”

Judi Thomas and other Heritage Centre volunteers have also been working closely with teachers and children at Bampton School who have been learning more about their town. Two classes visited the Heritage Centre and were taken on a special guided town trail during which the children were taught more about some of the town’s buildings and history from the centre’s guides. Judi added “We’re delighted to have the support of the school teachers as we aim to encourage residents and visitors of all ages to appreciate our rich social and industrial heritage and historic buildings.”

The group have also produced a new booklet which gives the history of St Michael and All Angels Church – believed to the town’s oldest building.

Katrina Munro, chair of the Trustees, said, “This project has helped everyone involved to learn so much about our town. Many of the buildings we see today have a rich and colourful history and many have fine architectural features. Through this exhibition, we hope more people will visit our town and learn about our heritage. We’re very grateful to The National Lottery Heritage Fund for supporting the project. Aspects such as the exhibition, family town trial, new guide book to the church and oral archive will help us to reach as many people as possible.”

The Heritage and Visitor Centre, which is based inside St Michael and All Angels Church, is open from Wednesday to Saturday 11am to 3pm.

Everyone is welcome to join the volunteers for the Exhibition launch at the Centre on Friday 20 September starting at 7pm. Free refreshments will be served.

There will be a special Bampton Guided Town Trail at 11am on Saturday 21 September. Find out more or book a space by emailing bamptonheritage@btinternet.com or phoning Wendy Boothroyd on 01398 331219. Guided town trials can also be arranged for groups on other dates.

HISTORIC BUILDINGS FESTIVAL AND PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION

Exmoor’s first ever Historic Buildings Festival is due to kick off this month, with a week of events celebrating the National Park’s impressive array of buildings from throughout the ages.

From 16-22 September, a wide range of expert walks, talks and practical demonstrations will be on offer celebrating this cultural heritage. Guest speakers and skilled craftspeople will shed light on how and why these structures came to be and what they can teach us about how our ancestors lived and worked. The Festival forms part of Heritage Open Days*, when places right across the country throw open their doors to celebrate their heritage, community and history.

The week of largely free events will begin with an open day to see conservation in action in Simonsbath’s Ashcombe Gardens, where a project is underway to restore and uncover the story behind a Picturesque garden and the unusual Scottish croft-house that formed part of it. This is the first time the public will have an opportunity to go inside the buildings since restoration works began, and the first time they have been without scaffolding for many years.

Find out the story of Lynton and Lynmouth’s famous cliff railway and walk in the footsteps of computer pioneer Ada Lovelace to discover the extensive network of intriguing paths, viewpoints and tunnels found on her former Porlock estate. Get an exclusive tour of medieval buildings in Dunster as part of a project to trace and record the town’s early history and take part in a convoy of military vehicles on route to the former secret Second World War radar station and tank training grounds found on Minehead’s North Hill.

Festival organiser Thomas Thurlow, Exmoor National Park Authority’s Historic Buildings Officer, said: “Whether it’s the medieval hall houses of Dunster, the late Georgian Scottish croft-style buildings of Simonsbath, or the industrial structures of the West Somerset Mineral Line, all these buildings have a story to tell and have helped shape the landscape we see today. There are so many historic treasures to be found on Exmoor if you know where to look and we can’t wait to showcase these amazing buildings.”

The full programme of events can be found on the Exmoor National Park Authority website at www.exmoor-nationalpark.gov.uk/historicbuildingsfestival and is available in printed form free from National Park Centres in Lynmouth, Dunster and Dulverton.

People may also wish to take part in the Exmoor Society photographic competition, which this year includes a historic buildings category (the closing date is 30 September). Find out more at www.exmoorsociety.com/content/news/alfred-vowles-photographic-competition-2

PHOTO: White Rock Cottage in Simonsbath seen without scaffolding for the first time in decades.

HERITAGE TRAIL OF NORTH DEVON TO LAUNCH ON D-DAY ANNIVERSARY

75 years on from the D-Day landings a new trail launched this week will commemorate 12 of the most important military and cultural sites of the Second World War in North Devon. The World War II Heritage Trail will be unique in including sites of both strategic magnitude and human significance, and will highlight locations from Great Torrington in the south to Watermouth Cove in the north of the area.

Developed by North Devon’s museums and the North Devon Coast Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, the trail unveiling follows the announcement that one of its sites, the D-Day practice structures at Braunton Burrows, is to be given heritage protection by the Department for Media, Culture and Sport, on the advice of Historic England.

Each location on the North Devon-wide, 12-point trail will be marked with a bronze plaque. An accompanying booklet will feature an area map and grid references, helping local people and visitors to find their way around the key sites while revealing the military and human stories behind them.

Claire Gulliver, project coordinator, said: “The North Devon coast closely resembled that of Normandy. We hope that this trail will bring to life the military strategy that was being developed on North Devon’s beaches, estuaries and sand dunes, in practising for the biggest amphibious assault in military history. But we also hope to evoke the human stories of the British and Allied soldiers who lived and trained here, together with those of the local communities they mixed with.

“Some of the trail sites are well known for the role they played in the D-Day preparations, such as the concrete structures at Braunton Burrows where soldiers practised debarking from their landing craft, or the dunes of Northam Burrows where British personnel experimented with adapted tanks known as ‘Hobart’s Funnies’. Other locations are more surprising, such as Torrington Square where off-duty American GIs used to gather before a night out on the town, or the American Red Cross Centre in Woolacombe, now the Red Barn Pub and popular with surfers today.”

A special booklet, Devon D-Day: A World War II Heritage Trail of the North Devon Coast will be available from museums from the D-Day anniversary, 6 June.

The trail is part of Devon D-Day. Devon D-Day is supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, with additional financial support from North Devon Council, North Devon Coast AONB and North Devon Marketing Bureau.

PHOTO: GI soldiers at the American Red Cross Centre, Woolacombe (now the Red Barn pub), 1943 (courtesy of Mortehoe Museum).

 

COWBRIDGE SAWMILL OPEN WEEKEND

Cowbridge Sawmill at Timberscombe will be opening its doors for National Mills Weekend on Saturday 11 and Sunday 12 May.

Records show that there was a corn mill at Cowbridge as far back as 1341. The mill prospered as a corn mill for six centuries but was converted to a sawmill in 1904. By the time last tenant retired in 1993 the building was in a derelict condition. It was in this state that Owen Rush purchased the mill – much against the advice of his friends!

Owen’s vision was of a working vintage sawmill and forge. His first task was to renovate the dwelling house closely followed by the mill. Once the structure was safe, the restoration of the machinery began.

The waterwheel was in a dilapidated state and a new shaft was shaped from an old oak tree. New water buckets were constructed and the launder rebuilt.

Volunteers with a wide range of skills and interests gradually came forward from the local community to restore the vintage machinery and install the shafts, pulleys, gears and levers necessary for the wheel to drive them.

Mr Rush has a substantial collection of historic machines, tools and artifacts for visitors to see on tours and Open Days. The working forge is now occupied by artistic blacksmith Belle Cole.

The site is a fabulous amenity for everyone who wishes to see our national heritage preserved. Volunteers are always welcome and appreciated and no particular skill is necessary. Whether or not you are mechanically minded, a visit to the mill is a fascinating step back in time. Why not visit and see the project for yourself?

Their Visitors’ Book contains many superlatives and accolades. Bearing in mind Mr Rush’s long-term vision, perhaps the most fitting comment was written by a couple from Bristol, “Mind blowing and inspiring. Thanks goodness someone is preserving our heritage.”

Cowbridge Sawmill will be open to the public on 11 and 12 May 2019 for National Mills Weekend and also on 14 and 15 September as part of the National Heritage Days. Guided tours will take place between 11am and 4.30pm and there are demonstrations of blacksmithing and woodturning throughout the day. Light refreshments are available. Parking and admission are free, but donations are much appreciated. Private tours of the mill are available by request. Further details can be found at www.cowbridgesawmill.org

LORNA DOONE ANNIVERSARY EVENTS BEGIN IN APRIL

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor by Victorian author R.D. Blackmore. This classic novel, set within the atmospheric Exmoor National Park, has never been out of print. Inspired by the natural beauty of the area, Blackmore’s love story includes historic events, such as The Great Winter and the Monmouth Rebellion, within the book as well as various local legends of the notorious Doones and the highway man Tom Faggus. The vivid descriptions of the most stunning, remote and rugged parts of Exmoor still apply today.

Throughout 2019 there will be a whole host of events to celebrate Lorna Doone and the special landscapes that gave rise to this ever-popular story. The focal point of this anniversary will be the Dulverton Heritage Centre who are holding a year-long exhibition starting in April. Curator Sue Baker explains, “The exhibition is a celebration of Lorna Doone; the author, story, setting and characters of this enduring love story.” She continues, “We’ve also included a feature on how Lorna Doone has been dramatised for stage, television and cinema, with stories of how local people have been involved.”

Visitors can explore the landscape that framed the book with a series of guided walks and talks from Wild About Exmoor throughout the summer. There is a family weekend taking place in Dulverton 29/30 June, complete with dramatic re-enactments. At Valley of Rocks, the Pleasure Dome Theatre Company are putting on outdoor theatre performances of Lorna Doone between 20 and 31 August as the sun sets.

The prestigious Two Moors Festival is also involved. The festival’s Artistic Director, Penny Adie, has commissioned a brand new work based on the well-loved story. The composition will be scored for solo voices, choir, instrumentalists and narrator and will be performed at All Saints Church in Dulverton on 12 October with professional musicians and students from Blundells School in Tiverton where Blackmore himself studied. Many other events are taking place.

Jennette Baxter, Marketing Manager for Visit Exmoor, welcomes the celebrations. “Many visitors are inspired to Visit Exmoor after reading Lorna Doone. This special anniversary allows us to highlight the contribution Blackmore’s novel has made to the area. We are delighted that businesses are taking the opportunity to commemorate the occasion. Visit Exmoor has produced a handy pocket guide as an introduction to some of the best places to visit to evoke those Lorna Doone moments.”

Visitors can check all event details and download a guide via www.Visit-Exmoor.co.uk or pick up a leaflet at one of the three Exmoor National Park Centres in Dulverton, Lynmouth and Dunster.

Photo courtesy of Lycia Moore, Taunton Garrison

NEW COASTAL TRAIL TO REVEAL NORTH DEVON’S AMERICAN GI STORY

Visitors to North Devon this summer will be able to discover the area’s hidden wartime past as evidenced in its iconic coastal landscape.

Thanks to an Arts Council lottery grant secured by the Museum of Barnstaple and North Devon, important Second World War locations, including sites used to prepare for the D-Day landings, will join a new coastal heritage trail linking the landscape with local museums’ wartime collections.

15 bronze plaques will mark significant Second World War sites along the coastline from Hartland to Mortehoe, and will be accompanied by an illustrated visitor guide.

The project, Devon D-Day, will add a new dimension to the popular Saunton D-Day/D-Day Devon event which takes place at Saunton Sands each year and recalls the training of 10,000 American GIs who arrived in 1943 to prepare for the Normandy landings among the sand-dunes of North Devon.

The £14,600 grant will also enable experts to provide educational events for local schoolchildren, provide a 1940s-style tea dance for all ages and support a mysterious drama opportunity for a handful of local young men.

Executive Member for Parks Leisure and Culture at North Devon Council, Councillor Dick Jones, says: “The coast of North Devon, with its beaches, estuaries and sand-dunes, offered American troops the perfect stand-in for the Normandy beaches while they perfected their amphibious assault strategy. 10,000 American GIs were stationed in North Devon. It was a huge thing for the local community and intriguing glimpses of the past are visible today in the North Devon landscape. We hope that this new project will enable visitors, including perhaps those descended from the American GIs themselves, to discover this vibrant part of our coastal history on the 75th anniversary of the arrival of the American forces.”

Devon D-Day is supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, with additional financial support from North Devon Council, North Devon Coast AONB Sustainable Development Fund and North Devon Marketing Bureau.

PHOTO: First Wave 44 Living History group on Braunton Burrows.

 

READY, SET, HERITAGE!

Do you want to find out more about the hidden heritage in North Devon? A new Coastal Heritage project is currently underway led by the new North Devon Coast AONB Heritage Officer, Joe Penfold. Joe has spent the last five years working for the Shropshire Hills AONB Partnership where he helped to conserve, enhance and celebrate the local historical features.

Within North Devon Joe plans to use his previous knowledge and skills to develop opportunities for volunteers to train in the use of practical archaeological skills as well as to conserve and assess the condition of the heritage sites with a particular-focus on coastal hillforts, the history of Hartland and World War II features.

Joe Penfold, AONB Heritage Officer said, “The North Devon coast is a treasure trove of landmarks, stories and events from a bygone age. Getting involved in the Coastal Heritage project is a great way to meet new people, to learn something new about the landscape and to take action to conserve it. I will also be offering work experience placements to any budding archaeologists in the area.”

In addition to the practical aspects of this project Joe will produce new interpretation materials and organise heritage related talks and walks for those living in the area to better understand and enjoy the history that matters to them. A key element of the project is also to support community-led activities and celebrations such as next year’s 75th D-Day Commemorations.

The project is being delivered and funded by local partners working with the AONB team including Devon County Council’s Heritage Team, the National Trust, North Devon Archaeological Society, North Devon Council’s Museum Development Officer, Torridge District Council and Hartland Parish Council.

Jenny Carey-Wood, AONB Manager, said, “We have some fantastic hidden heritage across North Devon and we welcome Joe’s skills and experience to engage local people and visitors in discovering more about our coastal history.”

This winter there will be opportunities to get involved in the project across North Devon. If you have a passion for heritage and would like to know more please visit the website www.northdevon-aonb.org.uk or email us aonb@devon.gov.uk.

Photo: Digging at Clovelly Dykes

EXMOOR COMMUNITY MUSIC PROJECT COMMEMORATES FIRST WORLD WAR CENTENARY

Article and photos by Elizabeth Atkinson, Project Manager for ‘Fragments: Voices from the First World War’

West Somerset will be hosting the world première of a new choral piece by local composer Emily Feldberg on 10 November, involving more than 90 musicians from across Exmoor and beyond. Fragments: Voices from the First World War brings together the voices of British and German people caught up in the war, using original sources from the time. It will have its première at Minehead Avenue Methodist Church on the eve of the centenary of Armistice Day, and will be conducted by leading choral conductor Nigel Perrin. Tickets for the evening performance have already sold out, but there is still an opportunity to hear Fragments at the open rehearsal on the afternoon of 10 November, at the same venue, starting at 2pm.

The composer, who lives in Carhampton, started work on the hour-long piece in 2014, at the centenary of the outbreak of the conflict, and completed it earlier this year. “Writing any music about the First World War is extremely emotional,” she said. “I have spent the last four years both crying for the tragedy and questioning whether I was representing people’s experiences appropriately. I have really tried to let the voices of German and British participants speak for themselves.”

A wide range of texts dating from the First World War have been used for the piece, including the words of a Devon farmer, a Ruhr miner, a German soldier, a woman munitions worker, a grieving mother, a conscientious objector’s memoirs, the Somme Army report, a humorous poem from the Wipers Times and verses found on a scrap of newspaper in a German railway carriage in 1918. Different musical styles in the piece reflect this range. Starting and ending with the words, ‘Lest we forget,’ the music moves the listener from the first swells of patriotic fervour through the tragedy of loss, to the jaunty defiance in the face of danger of the Tommies in the trenches and the women in the munitions factories, and the horrors experienced in the mire of the Somme. It takes in both the agony of decision for conscientious objectors and the stoicism of young British and German soldiers in the face of impending death. The piece draws to an end with the sombre reflection that ‘Peace has come to a suffering world’ and the implied challenge expressed in the words of Quaker peace campaigner Corder Catchpool (1919): “We are only justified in going on living if our futures manifest, at every point and at all times, a heroism equal to that of those killed in battle.”

From the outset, this project has been shaped by the input of many different people in many different ways. “Composing a piece of music is only the beginning,” said Emily. “People have shared stories, suggested ideas, provided texts and given advice and encouragement. Each new contribution has changed and widened the end product. It really has become a community project, not only because of the number of people involved in the first performance, but also because of those who have influenced its development.” Even the publicity has drawn on local inspiration, featuring graffiti scratched into the lead roof of Carhampton church tower 100 years ago: ‘PEACE NOV 11 18’.

The title of the piece was the result of much debate. Eventually, the idea came from Di Osborn of Roadwater, whose husband John is singing in the performance: “I thought perhaps you could call it just Fragments: Voices from the First World War,” she wrote, “then the ‘fragments’ would reference not only the snatches of text but those poor young men who got blown to smithereens and also the fragmented lives caused by warfare.” A century on, those fragments still impact on the lives of most of us, and this has both contributed to the content of the piece and deepened the involvement of many participants, and may well add poignancy to the experience of the audience in November.

Most of the participants have a direct connection to the conflict. The section on Conscientious Objectors was inspired by materials provided by Chris Lawson of Minehead Quakers (Chris and his wife Christina will both be involved in the performance) whose father was a Conscientious Objector in the First World War. Among other materials, Chris provided Emily with the journal of a member of the Friends Ambulance Unit, with which two uncles of Philippa Gerry, who is singing in the piece, also served. Philippa’s father was shot and gassed on the Somme, an aunt supervised hospital trains, a cousin nursed the wounded in northern France and died of pneumonia and two more uncles’ lives were irretrievably changed by shell shock. Thelma Vernon’s grandfather, like so many others, was killed in the first year of the war, while Helen Jowett was moved by her own grandfather’s experience of the trenches to write a poem, ‘Devon Farmer’, which now forms part of the libretto of the piece (the only text not actually dating from the war). And the effect is felt through the generations: the baritone soloist for November’s performance, Jamie Rock (a favourite visiting soloist for Minehead audiences), wrote, “My Great Great Grandfather fought and died in WW1, so it will mean a lot to me and my family to represent his fallen friends and foes. I hope my Granny will be able to make it over for the performance.” And one survivor of the conflict will be present at the performance: Tim Hedgecock will be playing in the orchestra on a violin his grandfather played in an army band in India during the war.

Links with the German experience of the war are also important for many of the participants. Emily has German family links herself, and has also drawn on the accounts of German friends and relatives. Emily’s friend Anna Fleisch related how her grandfather only spoke about one aspect of his experience of the war: although billeted on enemy ground, his unit were given cake by the women in the village on their safe return from the trenches, and Emily has used this for the section entitled ‘Kuchen’ (‘Cake!’) in the piece. For other participants, the German link is more recent: “I’m half German,” said Bill Griffiths. “My mum would have been really proud that I’m doing this.”

Orchestral rehearsals started back in 2017, and a choir of more than 50 singers started rehearsals in April of this year, with members coming from as far afield as London, Yorkshire and Scotland, as well as from a wide range of local choral groups. Participants’ responses to the music have been overwhelming. Helen Jowett wrote, “The music is wonderful and so emotional – I can’t sing ‘Kuchen’ [depicting a mother who has lost her son] without a wobbly voice!” while cellist Jenny Quick wrote, “It is a fantastic achievement and already wielding the power to touch and move us all.” Singer John Osborn, writing in response to a full-day workshop with conductor Nigel Perrin, wrote, “I have Emily’s music in my head all the time. I was three feet off the ground when I got home from Saturday’s workshop – it was one of the best days I’ve ever had.”

For some singers, this is the culmination of a lifetime’s ambition. Tim Pettigrew, who is singing a solo from the choir as a conscientious objector, wrote, “It realises a childhood dream when my Mum started taking me to the Three Choirs Festival in Worcester Cathedral (in the 1950s and ’60s) and I remember being emotionally electrified for days afterwards by the baritone solo of the Priest at the conclusion of Part 1 of The Dream of Gerontius.  I wondered what it must be like to sing something like that and even daydreamed that I might do something similar one day. Well now, some 60 years later, you have realised my dream and have given me a musical experience that I will cherish and which will be with me for the rest of my life.”

The project is also bringing together singers with a wide range of musical experience and expertise: some have never been involved in anything on this scale before and some don’t read music but have learnt the whole piece from singing along with the music on the project website, while others are seasoned performers bringing their skills to the piece to the benefit of all concerned. The orchestra, too, contains players with a wide range of skills and experience, including one adult learner who has never played in an orchestra before. Participants’ own suggestions have also led to additional support: they can now sing along to their own lines on the website, watch videos of rehearsal sections, practise their German pronunciation with online tutorials and attend extra sections for note-learning. “The rehearsals have a real buzz,” said Emily. “You can feel the commitment.”

An Arts Council grant has enabled the amateur performers to work both with conductor Nigel Perrin and with five professional orchestral players, and local individual and business patrons are also supporting the project with funding and services. There are still opportunities to give support: please email emilyfeldberg@btinternet.com or phone 01643 821756 for details.

Entry to the open rehearsal on 10 November is free, but donations towards the cost of the project would be welcomed. Souvenir programmes will be on sale at the rehearsal, containing the full text of Fragments and the composer’s notes on the piece: anyone attending the rehearsal or performance is advised to read these before it starts if they can. As it is a working rehearsal (so visitors are asked to remain silent), there may be some stops and starts, but a full run-through of the hour-long piece is planned for shortly after 2pm.

To find out more about the project and get a flavour of the music, visit www.emily-feldberg-music.uk/ or simply search online for Emily Feldberg music.

PHOTO: Emily, the composer, working with the orchestra.

 

 

 

 

AUCTION OF THE DULVERTON LAUNDRY BUILDING: STATEMENT FROM DWLCT

The following is a statement, from Philip Hull, put out by the Dulverton Weir and Leat Conservation Trust…

The auction of the Dulverton Laundry building will take place at Taunton Racecourse at 3pm on 11 December. The guide price is £250,000 approx.

DWLCT always felt that once the project to restore the upper part of Dulverton Urban Watermill Landscape (weir & mill leat) was completed, the safeguarding of the Dulverton Laundry building would be a logical extension to Trust activities, our strong partner and stakeholder network being the perfect vehicle for this to take place. It is unfortunate that the laundry building has become available somewhat earlier than we all expected.

The Trustees of DWLCT take the view that the Trust is not currently in a position to seek to acquire ownership (or give undertakings of acquiring ownership) of the laundry building at this point in time. All of our partnership agreements, funding applications and donor monies received are on the basis of the current clearly defined weir & leat project.

Over the past few weeks the Trust has been in discussion with partners and other interested parties to try to identify any solutions for the building which would not require a purchase at this stage, these efforts have however been unsuccessful.

We understand the current owner’s need to dispose of the building which is listed, empty and in a parlous state; and we await the outcome of the auction with interest.